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Tuesday, July 7, 2015

Pest Control for Your Horses By: Dr. A Blake

Fly season is upon us and that means that your four legged friends are going to be bothered by those pesky flies! Today I will talk about a few tips to help your ponies stay fly free.  There are multiple options for ways to safely control flies.  Topical fly sprays are a great option to help fly control with your horses. I recommend an oil-based spray such as Endure made by Farnam.  This spray is sweat proof and can stay on for up to 14 days.  It also protects against other outdoor bugs such as: ticks, lice and gnats.   Another option for pest control is oral feed supplements.  I would recommend a product such as smartbug-off pellets made by Smart Pak.  This product is safe to use and contains many natural ingredients to help prevent flies, such as; garlic, apple cider vinegar, and omega 6 fatty acids.
 Other ways to safely protect your horse from flies would include: frequent manure removal and fly masks or sheets for the face.  Frequent manure removal helps by decreasing what physically attracts flies.  Although it will not solve the problem it will decrease the amount of flies.  Although fly sheets can be very helpful be sure to look at the material and take into account your horse’s environment to maintain a comfortable temperature and make sure the sheets are not too heavy.  Another fly control option, fly masks, not only control flies but in horses with white noses some masks have a nose piece that helps with sunburn.  Lastly, outdoor fly traps are also a good idea but make sure to put these products where horses and other animals cannot access them and ingest the material.   These are just some helpful tips to keep your four legged friend more comfortable this summer.   If you have any questions about horse products or need to schedule an exam, contact AV Veterinary Center @ 661-729-1500. We do house calls!


Monday, February 2, 2015

Pancreatitis - By: Dr. Julie Cull

During this season, not only have we been snacking on extra treats, but our furry friends have as well. Pets that receive an unbalanced diet can lead to many health issues. One of these painful issues is Pancreatitis or inflammation of the Pancreas. This is a very painful occurrence that requires treatment immediately.  Causes of this diagnosis is not always known but there are several ways of treating Pancreatitis.
The pancreas is the organ next to the stomach that produces enzymes needed for digestion of food in the intestines.  Therefore, when the pancreas is inflamed, it has trouble producing the enzymes that help with digestion. Pancreatitis can be very painful, and dogs can become lethargic, stop eating, begin vomiting, have diarrhea and or show signs of abdominal pain.  However, when pets present for vomiting, diarrhea or lethargy there is a long list of possible causes that your veterinarian will try to rule out.  An easy blood sample and in house test can be taken to diagnose Pancreatitis.
The cause of Pancreatitis is often unknown.  It can be caused by eating a high fat meal or treat, some medications and for some dogs the cause remains unknown.  Treatment consists of supportive care for your pet.  Dogs that present with vomiting, diarrhea or in pain will often need to be hospitalized and placed on intravenous fluids to help correct any dehydration. Pain medications are often given to pets experiencing a bout of pancreatitis. Sometimes antibiotics will be given if it is suspected that a pet may also have an infection in the intestinal tract.  Lastly, stomach protecting medications are given to reduce the buildup of acid in the stomach and help prevent stomach ulcers.
Pancreatitis can be life threatening in some patients so hospitalization and intensive monitoring will be required for several days.  In many pets that experience pancreatitis, they can be prone to experience future bouts of pancreatitis.  Early recognition of signs is important as it can help to decrease the amount of time a pet will need to spend in the hospital. If you have questions about Pancreatitis, or think your pet is showing symptoms please call, AV Veterinary Center (661)729-1500, All Creatures Veterinary Center (661)291-1121 or Canyon Country Veterinary Hospital (661) 424-9900.

Wednesday, November 12, 2014

Holiday Toxicities
By: Lauren Sanchez


The holidays are a time of celebrations, festivities and adornments. With all of the activities and distractions, potential dangers and toxicities to your pet can be overlooked. There are several holiday items that need to be kept away from curious dogs and cats. However, some plants, foods, or even ornaments may be ingested leading to an unplanned trip to your veterinarian. Here are some things to be aware of to keep your pet happy and healthy during the holiday season:
Common winter plants such as Poinsettias, Holly,and Mistletoe that are brought home during the holidays may be toxic to pets. Poinsettias (Euphorbia Pulcherrima), if ingested, are only mildly toxic. Poinsettias have a milky sap that will irritate the mouth and stomach and sometimes cause vomiting and dizziness. However, varieties of English, Japanese, and  Chinese Holly (Ilex Opaca) contain toxic Saponins or chemicals. When English or Christmas Holly is ingested, it can cause severe gastrointestinal problems which symptoms may include: drooling, excessive head shaking, and injury from the spiny leaves usually found on this type of plant. Lastly, Mistletoe (Phoradendron Flavescens) is commonly found in households during the holiday season. When ingested this plant will cause cats and dogs to have gastrointestinal irritation resulting in vomiting and diarrhea. If any of the listed plants are a key accent to your holiday d├ęcor and are believed to have been ingested, immediately call your veterinarian for medical advice.
It is important to have pets on a diet that is suitable to their type of species and needs. Although treats and rewards are nice, certain foods need to be avoided. Many cases of acute renal failure are associated with grape and raisin ingestion. Also, foods like chocolate and onions have a negative effect on dogs and cats. If eaten; onion may cause a breakdown in red blood cells causing blood in the urine, along with weakness, and a high heart rate. Chocolate, some gums and candy can cause heart disturbances and even seizures depending on the amount eaten. Lastly, bones should always be pre-approved or supplementary chew toys can be given. Turkey, chicken, and boiled bones should never be given to a pet. The effects of these bones include: damage to the esophagus, windpipe, stomach, and intestines. Before leaving these toxic foods out, it is highly important to check if they are within reach of a curious pet.
           Every animal enjoys chewing! Whether it be an expensive pair of shoes or a new ball, our furry friends take great enjoyment making use of an accessible toy. As holiday decorations are quickly making an appearance, many pets have a whole new territory to explore. When broken, holiday ornaments can create small shards which can puncture the esophagus, stomach, or other parts inside the animal's body. Shiny Tinsel can also attract an animal's attention in an instant and if ingested, it can be damaging to the intestines and cause severe vomiting or diarrhea. If the particles cannot be passed they will require veterinary attention and possible surgery. Although these items are often viewed as potentially harmless; even Christmas tree water can be harmful to pets if the water has been treated with chemicals.
Preventive care is the most effective way of keeping pets in good health during the holiday season. Be aware of dangerous plants, foods, and foreign items around your home.  Always supervise pets when given treats or toys and check surroundings for possible hazards.When accidents occur, stay calm and call a veterinarian immediately to avoid further complications. By taking caution and avoiding toxicities, both pets and their owners will have a happy and healthy holiday season.

Wednesday, August 6, 2014

Summer Vacation

Summer Vacation-- Lauren Sanchez The kids are out of school, time off has been submitted and family vacations are in full effect. Summer is here and with these extra activities being planned, sometimes the family pets are a little bit neglected. Whether your pets are traveling with you or staying with a sitter; here are some pointers to ensure your furry friends are enjoying summer just as much as you are: Emergency numbers should be left with the pet sitter. For example your pet’s regular vet as well as the closest emergency veterinarian’s contact information should be available. Also, both vets should be called and left with authorization for the pet sitter to treat your pet as well as a valid credit card. Emergencies can happen and by knowing your pet is in good hands, your mind will be at ease. For the pets lucky enough to ride along for the trip, a checklist of items should be marked off. Your pet should be up to date with all vaccines and documentation of these should be taken with you. Also, your pet should have an I.D. tag and microchip incase they wander off in a new place. Many areas have pet friendly hotels and restaurants so a search online can be conducted to accommodate your furry friend. Water should always be available and even more if traveling to a warmer climate. Lastly, in case of any emergencies, you should locate the nearest veterinarian to your vacation destination. Summer is a time that should be fun for all of the members in your family. When planning vacations, consider your pets and where they will be going. Also, keep in mind the luggage that your dog or cat will need on these trips. With proper preparation, the hot summer can be a positive and fun experience. If you have any questions about temperatures appropriate for your pet or what documentation you may need during your travels, please contact AV Veterinary Center @ 661-729-1500, All Creatures Veterinary Center @ 661-291-1121 of Canyon Country Veterinary Hospital @ 661-424-9900.

Summer Vacation

Summer Vacation-- Lauren Sanchez The kids are out of school, time off has been submitted and family vacations are in full effect. Summer is here and with these extra activities being planned, sometimes the family pets are a little bit neglected. Whether your pets are traveling with you or staying with a sitter; here are some pointers to ensure your furry friends are enjoying summer just as much as you are: Emergency numbers should be left with the pet sitter. For example your pet’s regular vet as well as the closest emergency veterinarian’s contact information should be available. Also, both vets should be called and left with authorization for the pet sitter to treat your pet as well as a valid credit card. Emergencies can happen and by knowing your pet is in good hands, your mind will be at ease. For the pets lucky enough to ride along for the trip, a checklist of items should be marked off. Your pet should be up to date with all vaccines and documentation of these should be taken with you. Also, your pet should have an I.D. tag and microchip incase they wander off in a new place. Many areas have pet friendly hotels and restaurants so a search online can be conducted to accommodate your furry friend. Water should always be available and even more if traveling to a warmer climate. Lastly, in case of any emergencies, you should locate the nearest veterinarian to your vacation destination. Summer is a time that should be fun for all of the members in your family. When planning vacations, consider your pets and where they will be going. Also, keep in mind the luggage that your dog or cat will need on these trips. With proper preparation, the hot summer can be a positive and fun experience. If you have any questions about temperatures appropriate for your pet or what documentation you may need during your travels, please contact AV Veterinary Center @ 661-729-1500, All Creatures Veterinary Center @ 661-291-1121 of Canyon Country Veterinary Hospital @ 661-424-9900.